Cleveland RAYNET Group

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Message Form

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The form

The TO address

The FROM address

The INFORM ALSO address

Origin

Text

Long text

Serial numbers in text

Boxes at the bottom of the form

Example form

The form

The RAYNET message form is quite simple to understand and contains the essential elements necessary to fulfil its function.  Communication forms used by other organisations may have extra boxes.  If this is required, the extra information can be written in the text area.

The format of the RAYNET message form works.  It has been used at many minor and major incidents over many years.  Here is an example message:

The first three boxes at the top are address boxes.  They indicate the location of RAYNET stations at the event.  Address names should be kept standard for the event.  They may indicate a location or the function of a User Service person.  Address names should be made short for simplicity and speed of writing.

Examples of addresses are:  Control, HQ, CP3 (Checkpoint 3), Yarm, Doctor 2, Vet 1, Amb 6 (Ambulance 6), EPU (Emergency Planning Unit), Ayton, Easby, Sweeper B, Bronze, Silver, Gold.

An example of a poor address is Sutton-Under-Whitestonecliff.  Sutton would do.

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The TO address

This is the final destination of the message.  It will usually be a single location.  It could be All Stations.  It could be CP6 to CP10.

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The FROM address

This is the address of the originator of the message.

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The INFORM ALSO address

This is the address of other stations which should receive the message.  The text should make it clear whether all destination stations should take action on the message or if the message has been sent only for information purposes to some.

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Origin

The Origin is a number formed by the date and time that the message was written.  As well as indicating delays in the network when messages are received long after they were written, the Origin number also acts as a message serial number.

If today is the 23rd of the month and the time you write the message is 10:18 hrs, then the message Origin number is 23 1018.  Do NOT round up the time to the nearest five minutes as this could prevent the Origin number from acting as a unique serial number.

If message number 23 1018 contained a list of queries, then any reply could have the text starting with the sentence “Re your message 23 1018.” which means “With reference to your message with the Origin number of 23 1018”.  This is an efficient way of connecting a message with a previous message.

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Text

Remember "brevity" and "concise".  The longer the message, the longer it takes to send.  The more messages sent, the longer the radio channels are tied up. There is an art in wording a message and that skill can come with a little practise and forethought.  The general rule is “Cut it to the bone”.

Consider the following two messages which essentially convey a similar meaning.  One rambles on and takes ages to write.  The other doesn't:-

  1. We need to know about the following. Please enquire at your location to find out if any members of our organisation know if they have seen the white utility vehicle known as SJ C12.  It is the one which is based at Rayton, or at least spends most of its time there except when it is used by the adjacent divisions.  In case people didn’t notice the vehicle itself but saw some of the personnel manning it, the people using it today are Bob Martin and his team. Please send your reply to this location.

  2. Have you seen Bob Martin’s team or SJ C12?

If you send a message such as “We need more staff and more snafflebolts.”, you are guaranteed to get a message back saying “How many staff and how many snafflebolts?”

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Long text

If it is really necessary, continue the text on another form.  Often, long messages are better sent as two messages.

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Serial numbers in text

Some events have a requirement to pass many competitor’s serial numbers.  So that errors can be both minimised and quickly spotted, it is advisable to do the following:-

  1. Write the serial numbers in numerical order. It takes time but is well worth it.

  2. Leave a reasonable space between each serial number.

  3. Do NOT put commas or other punctuation marks between serial numbers. They may be read as 1s or other numbers.

  4. Don’t write down a group of many consecutive serial numbers. Instead, write the first and last of the consecutive group, separated by a “right arrow”.

  5. Don’t use the word “to” instead of a right arrow as it may end up being written as a figure 2.

  6. At the end of the text, write down the total number of serial numbers in the message.

Here is an example of the text of a message which mentions many serial numbers:-

Checked in:  5  9  14  15  16  21  25  32  33  35 -> 42  46  51  54  56 -> 67  72  73  74  79  83 -> 88  98  101  106  109  114  115  128  131 -> 139  147.  Total 59.

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Boxes at the bottom of the form

These are for the use of the RAYNET operators.

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Example form

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You can send an e-mail message to Cleveland RAYNET Group by clicking here.   This will fail if you use web-based e-mail.
Page updated on 09 January 2017

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